Fly Fishers' Republic

Adams

April 19, 2006

by Raif Killips

Adams

Recipe:

Uses:

The Adams is a well-known fly tied in a wide range of sizes. Used primarily to target trout, the fly is used in its smaller sizes to cover midge hatches and mayfly hatches. In the right size it makes a reasonable impression of a blue winged olive or other small grey/olive bodied ephemerid. Larger versions are serviceable in a drake hatch. The Adams is considered by many, a “go to” fly, and a very useful searching pattern.

How to fish:

Fished using standard dry fly presentation techniques. When no specific insect predominates on the water and it is not clear what the fish are feeding on, a well presented Adams is a good way to hedge your bets.

History:

This pattern originated from the vice of Leonard Halladay, Michigan, U.S.A. and takes it's name from Charles F. Adams who fished the pattern on the Boardman River.

Variations:

Two variations include an 'Irish Adams'(olive body) and an 'Egg Laying Adams' (yellow butt). The Parachute Adams is another variation, having a polyester/antron wool or hair wing post and a parachute rather than collar hackle. You'll also find an 'Adams Irresistible'...

Further reading:

Fly Patterns and Their Origins, 1943, Harold Hinsdill Smedley, Westshore Publications. Trout and Salmon Fly Index, Dick Surette, Stackpole Books. These books are usually available from Amazon.